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OLD TIME TRADITIONAL MUSIC JAMS

We have been gathering around the Valley sharing tunes and songs for over 20 years. We play a mix of traditional fiddle tunes, Appalachian Mountain music, Canadian, Irish & Scottish tunes (jigs, polkas, reels, waltzes, hornpipes) and more. 

 

Click here to see some of these tunes.

All are welcome 

Please join us for our open Old-Time Jam Sessions. Players of all ages and ability come together in the time-honored tradition of gathering and playing music.

We encourage acoustical instruments to share in these traditional tunes. Fiddles, dulcimers, banjos, guitars, harps, accordions, mandolins, dobros, zithers, upright bass, Irish whistles, flutes, bodhrans, rhythm bones, spoons, and more. 

FEATURED HIGHLIGHT | 2nd Annual Barn Jam
JANUARY 2024
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24 musicians gathered for the 2nd Annual Barn Jam, to record another set of videos. With some help from space heaters and hot chocolate, we jammed for several hours, and had a lot of fun.
 

Watch the videos >> Phoenix Old Music Society - YouTube

View Past Highlights >>

UPCOMING JAMS

MAR*

2

MAR

16

APR

6

APR

20

*March 2nd Jam will be at the Glendale Folk & Heritage Festival. 10am to Noon

Glendale Foothills Library

19055 N. 57th Ave, Glendale, AZ 85308

10:30am - 12:30pm

(Pre-jam set-up and tuning from 10-10:30am)

 

Click here for directions and more information.

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OLD TIME VS BLUEGRASS | ARE THEY DIFFERENT?

Musicians in an Old-Time Jam Session play together from start to finish, without any solos. In a typical Bluegrass Jam Session, each musician performs a solo during the tune, also referred to as "taking a break". Additionally, Bluegrass music is played much faster.

Our sessions are played at a moderate tempo, allowing for each musician to practice and improve their skills. Each player has an opportunity to choose (and/or lead) a song, ideally from our tune book so that everyone can participate.

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WHAT IS THAT INSTRUMENT?

The Mountain Dulcimer, also known as the Appalachian Dulcimer, first appeared among Scots-Irish immigrants that settled in the Appalachian Mountains. According to history, it was an invention of musical necessity and a solution to the challenges of crafting more complex instruments. It is considered a uniquely American instrument.

This beautiful instrument belongs to member Marcia Larson.

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© 2023 Baxter Imaging LLC

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